China in Spring Blossom

Written by Admin,   on Jul 26, 2020

After a white winter, spring dresses trees and flowers in colorful clad. In a five-part series, we take a look at some of the most breathtaking scenery across China. Spring is bringing with it one of the largest blossoming shows on the planet.

For thousands of years, western China has been famous for its four flower seasons, each represented by a popular blossom. Spring is the season of the orchid, and the brightly-colored flower has been used in Chinese medicine for millennia.

Visitors to China in the spring can also take in religiously significant magnolias and lilacs near Buddhist temples, imperial peonies outside the Forbidden City, cherry blossoms in Shanghai’s Gucun Forest Park, wildflowers on the slopes near the Great Wall, and fields of bright yellow rapeseed flowers in Guizhou.

China has some of the most magnificent blooming locations, including forests of cherry trees, azaleas, and peach trees that can be found all over the country.

During a short period between March and May, hundreds of blossom festivals take place across the nation, and many are dedicated to a particularly beloved local blossom.

 

One famous spring blossom festival is the Luoyang Peony Fair, which is a four-hour train ride south from Beijing in the Central Chinese province of Henan. The festival lasts from mid-April to mid-May, but the blossoms only peak at the end of April. During this time visitors can witness 200 species of the regal flower produce vibrant reds, yellows, and pinks.

 

Another popular event is The Pingu Peach Blossom Festival takes place every year on a 36,000 acre plot in the town of Liujiadian, 40 miles northeast of central Beijing. The massive peach farm is one of the largest in the world, hosting 600,000 trees that produce 300,000 tons of peaches every year. Visitors to the blossom festival will get to see 200 distinct varieties of the tree, which is native to China.

If you haven’t already booked your tickets to China for the spring blossoms, you might want to do it soon!

 

 

Credits:

matadornetwork.com

CCTV

thechinaguide.com

Leave a comment